Robert Mueller requests Trump-related portion of Manafort’s trial be kept secret because it revealed ‘substantive’ evidence

While the FoxNews crowd celebrates Manafort trial Judge TS Elilis’ taunts toward the Mueller team, ignoring the fact that he today apologized, those of us in the land of reality got an interesting tidbit today. From CNN:

In a filing Thursday, Mueller’s team said it wanted to keep a discussion between trial attorneys and Judge T.S. Ellis regarding a question to Gates secret because the transcript of the conversation would “reveal details of the ongoing investigation.”

….
Defense attorney Kevin Downing had asked Gates, “Were you interviewed on several occasions about your time at the Trump campaign?”

Prosecutor Greg Andres objected to the question before Gates could answer.

….

“Disclosing the identified transcript portions would reveal substantive evidence pertaining to an ongoing investigation … In addition, sealing will minimize any risk of prejudice from the disclosure of new information relating to that ongoing investigation,” the special counsel’s team wrote in a court filing Thursday. “The government’s concerns would continue until the relevant aspect of the investigation is revealed publicly, if that were to occur.”

That request was just granted.

Well, isn’t that all juicy. It’s reminding me an interview on Pod Save America a few weeks back with a journalist saying that the information she provided, which could be traced directly back to President Trump, will be a huge surprise to the public when it comes out, and is unrelated to Russia/the other collusion stories we have been hearing.

There is a LOT of information out there relevant to the case that we don’t know about yet.

Journalist reveals she provided source’s identity to the FBI:

But Wheeler, the publisher of the Empty Wheel blog, wrote that she felt compelled to talk to authorities about an individual she was convinced “played a significant role in the Russian election attack on the US.” Wheeler has not publicly named her source, but she told CNN in a Monday phone interview that the person “definitely did not want me to go to the FBI” and cautioned her in a text message against doing so.

“On its face, I broke one of the cardinal rules of journalism,” Wheeler told The Washington Post in a story published Sunday, “but what he was doing should cause a source to lose protection.”

more:

Her blog post centers on a text message she says she got from the source on Nov. 9, 2016 — about 14 hours after the polls closed — predicting that Michael Flynn, who would be Trump’s appointee for national security adviser, would be meeting with “Team Al-Assad” within 48 hours. Russia has been perhaps the Assad regime’s staunchest ally.

As she noted: “The substance of the text — that the Trump team started focusing on Syria right after the election — has been corroborated and tied to their discussions with Russia at least twice since then.”

Wheeler won’t say when she went to the FBI other than that it was in 2017. In December 2017, Flynn flipped, pleading guilty to one count of lying to the FBI about his contact with the Russian government during the presidential transition; Trump had fired him in February.

In addition to the knowledge of her source’s inside information, Wheeler said, she had reason to believe that the source was involved with efforts to compromise her website and other communications. And perhaps most important, that he was involved in cyberattacks — past and future — that had done and could do real harm to innocent people.

This party is just getting started.

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